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COMPREHENSION/UNDERSTANDING DIFFICULTIES

Comprehension difficulties may inhibit your family member in correctly understanding what is happening in his environment. He may not appropriately interpret what he hears or sees, or he may be confused when he attempts to understand what he hears and sees. For example, he may have difficulty understanding classroom lectures, and he may become even more confused when the instructor uses audio-visual aids such as graphs and charts to reinforce the main points of the lecture.

Your family member' s therapists may discuss auditory-comprehension difficulties. By this, they mean that he is having difficulty understanding what is said to him. He may have difficulties following specific directions, conversations, or major points of a lecture. He may also have difficulty picking up on humor in conversations. In particular, he may not understand puns and the other language subtleties that make up humor in conversation.

Visually, your family member may perceive information correctly but not truly understand it. A good example of this is the ability to read words and graphics but not truly understand sentences and paragraphs. If your family member once enjoyed reading, he may enjoy it much less now.

Examples

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.

The following are examples of comprehension difficulties you may observe in your family member:

1. He may appear to be out of the realm of conversations. He may either not answer questions or respond with off-the-wall comments. His response makes it appear that he did not quite understand the question or the intent of the question.

2. Your family member may take phone messages during the day, and then have difficulty explaining these messages to you when you return home. In following up on the messages, you may find that specific details, such as numbers and street names, may not be accurate.

3. Models and kits that include both written directions and illustrations may be particularly difficult for him to follow. This may not be the time for you to buy a new outdoor barbecue for him to put together in his spare time.

4. When you discuss a newspaper article with your family member, you may discover that you have keen differences of opinion about the facts stated in the article. You soon discover that he misinterpreted much of the article. In the course of your conversation, he may also relate that he did not finish the whole article. He may have lost interest in the article because he did not comprehend the details or main points.

Management Techniques

1. Your family member will probably always have difficulty following conversations. You will have to learn to expect off-the-wall comments from him periodically. In social conversations among his associates and friends, inaccurate interpretation of information is only a mild annoyance. However, in the employment arena, it could cost him his job. Strongly encourage him to ask for clarification of questions he does not understand. On business-related issues, he should insist that discussions and decisions be made in his office in one-on-one conversations and not in informal conversations at social gatherings.

2. Encourage your family member to ask for the correct spellings of names and street names. In that way there will be less chance of a mistake. He may have to adjust to the fact that he should not be the one responsible for taking phone messages.

3. Underestimating the difficulty of a task can be a downfall when deciding what your family member can and cannot do. Many times, tasks that appear easy are a sequence of difficult small steps. Avoid new projects that appear to be something that could fill your family member's time. If the projects are supplied with written directions and diagrams, they may only be a source of frustration.

4. Among comprehensive skills reading is at the highest level. Expect your family member to have difficulty in this area. In discussions of current events and news, reiterate the important details for him indirectly through your conversation. In that way, he won't become defensive and will be aware of current political and social issues.